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An Evening of Irish and Choctaw Poetry with Doireann Ní Ghríofa and LeAnne Howe Thursday, October 17th@ 7 pm EV-6.720 (1515 St. Catherine West, 6th floor)

Doireann Ní Ghríofa is a bilingual Irish writer whose books explore birth, death, desire, and domesticity. A Book of the Year in both The Irish Times and The Irish Independent, her most recent collection ‘Lies’ draws on a decade of her Irish language poems in translation. Awards for her work include a Lannan Literary Fellowship (USA, 2018), a Seamus Heaney Fellowship (Queen’s University, 2018), the Ostana Prize (Italy, 2018), and The Rooney Prize for Irish Literature (2016), among others. Doireann’s artistic practice encompasses cross-disciplinary collaborations, fusing poetry with film, dance, music, and visual art, and she has been invited to perform her work internationally, most recently in Scotland, Paris, Italy, and New Zealand. Her prose debut ‘A Ghost in the Throat’ is forthcoming from Tramp Press in spring 2020.

LeAnne Howe is a poet, novelist, filmmaker and scholar. She was born and raised in Oklahoma and is an enrolled citizen of the Choctaw Nation. Some awards include: the Western Literature Association’s 2015 Distinguished Achievement Award for her body of work; the inaugural 2014 MLA Prize for Studies in Native American Literatures; 2012 United States Artists Ford Fellowship; and a 2010 Fulbright Scholarship to Jordan. She received the American Book Award in 2002 for her first novel, Shell Shaker. Her most recent book, Savage Conversations, 2019, Coffee House Press, is the story of Mary Todd Lincoln and a Savage Indian spirit that she (Mary) imagined was torturing her nightly. Harvard scholar Philip J. Deloria writes, “[the book] explodes with the stench and guilt and insanity that undergirds the American story.” Searching For Sequoyah is Howe’s latest documentary film project with Ojibwe filmmaker James M. Fortier. The film is set in the U.S. and Mexico where Sequoyah (Cherokee) traveled as he was writing the Cherokee Syllabary in 1841. LeAnne Howe is the Eidson Distinguished Professor of American Literature in English at the University of Georgia.

Requests for more information contact Ali Pinkney
Email writersreadconcordia@gmail.com